The Simplest Takeaway Move in All of Golf – Only Have to Move 2 Inches!

If you want a perfect takeaway like that, listen up, because today is your lucky day. I promise you, if you do what I'm telling you, by the end of the day today, you're going to be able to go to the range and have a perfect, flawless takeaway that is as good or better than any tour pro on the planet. That seems pretty crazy to say. But I promise you, the takeaway is way simpler than what you're doing right now, today. Their problem is most golfers think about the takeaway as a position that you're trying to move the club into using your arms and hands.

Now, the reality is, the takeaway is a pretty big move. You've got to go from one, two, three, four, five, about six feet is how far that club head has got to move to the completion of the takeaway. Now, the takeaway is happening behind you. You can't see it, you can't see where the club's going because you're probably not doing this. If you are, golf's really really hard for you. What you're doing, you're keeping your head down here and trying to get the club to go into some imaginary position that your instructors told you or you've heard on TV or in a magazine. This club, we agree it probably needs to be somewhere in there during the completion the takeaway. Club's parallel to the ground, club slightly towed up, pointing down my feet line down the target.

What you see most amateurs do is going way back in here. Now, what creates this inside death move I call it, because from here you've got to do a million compensations to recover, is typically one of two things. Either, A, you take your right wrist and you hinge it back, and that moves the club head way inside. So, I'm not doing anything other than moving my right wrist. But look how far that golf club can move? That adds a tremendous amount of variability into the swing. Or I can do the same thing with my left wrist. Just rotating it and bowing it like this. This also moves the club a ton of distance.

Now, most amateur golfers pretty much do one of these two things, and that's what gets the club out of position. The reality is, and most tour pros do the exact opposite. They don't use their arms and hands to move the club, they use their body. Why? Well, in the same distance that that club is moving six feet during the takeaway, if you learn to move the way Rotary Swing is going to teach you, you only have to move two inches.

Two inches of movement of your body will create a six foot movement in the club head. Now, in my book that's a pretty good rate of return. That's the definition of efficiencies. If I can move myself two inches and get the club to not only go six feet, but also go back on plane and in the perfect position without me having to try, and I can do it every single time. Well, that's a win-win. I can move two inches way more consistently than anybody can try and move something six feet.

The trick is understanding the takeaway is all about moving from the inside out. Your arms and hands need to chill out for a minute because that is what's killing your takeaways. I just showed you just by doing a couple things with your wrist, look how far I can move that golf club? My body during this time doesn't have to do anything. That's what happens with most amateur golfers. They don't learn to load up their body. They don't learn to use their core and their trunk and their legs for power in the swing. They see the club, they know the club needs to end up over here, and they just pick it up and snatch it.

For those of you tend to have a really fast tempo and you can't get over this hit instinct, you can't get over the idea of trying to use arms and hands, and you can't control your transition, this is for you. Because the reality is, your body can't really move that fast during the takeaway if I'm moving the club just by moving my body. My arms and hands are made up of fast twitch muscle fibers, I can move the club all over the place really fast.

That same time, no matter how fast I try to move my body, the club can't go that fast. So, if you struggle with controlling your tempo and pace of your swing and the hit instinct, this is exactly what you need to hear right now. All you need to focus on to get that club to go back six feet is learning how to move a specific part of your body two inches. By doing that, watch what happens. Now, the club we agree should be somewhere in this position. Some people may want their club matching the spine angle. I don't agree with that, but it doesn't matter. For all intents and purposes today, we're just trying to get the club right here; down my toe line, parallel to the ground, in front of my chest, not whipped away back here inside.

One way I like to check this with my students is halfway back, I want to be able to shake hands with the right and left hand. Now, if you're using your wrist to take that club back, it is going to be a pretty weird handshake, right? It's not going to be a normal deal. So, what I want to feel is that I can shake hands with my right and left hand here. That gets the club face going back neutral, my hands are neutral and keeps the club from going way back inside.

Now, the trick is the club should do this exact same thing every single time, and end up in the exact same position like you see now. Now, I am not coordinated enough, and I doubt you are either to try and move the club six feet with my arms and hands, and get that club to go in the exact same spot every single time. But, I can take a specific part of my body and move it two inches and get the club to go back in the exact same spot every time like you just saw. That is the trick to the takeaway. Learning how to move my rib cage and my torso is all I need to do during the takeaway.

There's a little bit of reset, there's a little bit of shoulder elevation. We talk about arm elevation on the site, but the trick is really just doing nothing with your arms and hands and moving your body that two inches that I talk about. Now, the two inch movement is a really, really simple move. But there's a couple things you got to understand, that I want to explain in this bonus video that are going to help you understand how to get the most bang for the buck. Two inches of movement is going to create six feet of club head movement. When you check out this bonus video, I promise you, you're going to learn how to master the takeaway and never ever struggle with the club ripping inside ever again.

Chuck Quinton

Chuck Quinton

is the founder of the RotarySwing Tour online golf instruction learning system. He played golf professionally for 5 years and has been teaching golf since 1995 and has worked with more than 300 playing professionals who have played on the PGA, Web.com and other major tours around the world.